HEREDITARY CANCER RISK TEST

Discover how your DNA can determine your risk for cancer.
98 genes. 25 hereditary cancers.
The most comprehensive home test on the market.

$299

Order Now

WHY GET TESTED

Inherited genetic mutations can increase your cancer risk by up
to 40 times. 1,2,3

Lifetime Cancer Risk. 1,2,3


Knowing your risk can enable you to manage your health proactively.

You can work with your doctor on a screening program.
This may include starting screening at a younger age, or getting screened more frequently so cancer can be detected early.

Your doctor may prescribe preventative medication to reduce cancer risk.
Individuals at a higher risk for cancer can benefit from taking FDA-approved drugs such as tamoxifen and raloxifene to lower the chance of developing certain cancers.

Your family members can also determine their risk status and take charge of their health.
Parents, siblings, and children may have up to a 50% chance of carrying the same mutation, putting them at increased risk.


Early cancer detection dramatically improves survival rate. 5,6

HOW DOES THE TEST WORK

1

Purchase your test online.

2

Receive your ready-to-use collection kit in the mail.

3

Collect a saliva sample and ship directly to our laboratory in a pre-paid mailing envelope.

4

Receive your report in 3-4 weeks.

5

Talk to your doctor about a personalized health plan for yourself and your family.

WHAT IS THE TEST?

  • The test looks for mutations in 98 genes associated with 25 Hereditary Cancers including Breast, Ovarian, Prostate, Colon, Stomach, Head and Neck cancers.
    See full gene matrix here.
  • Every test result is reviewed by board-certified physicians.
  • You receive a report that includes information on the presence or absence of mutations associated with increased cancer risk.
    View a positive report here. View a negative report here.

WHY CELLMAX

  • The risk for cancer from having mutations in genes such as BRCA 1/2 are well known; however, the American College of Medical Geneticists (ACMG) recognizes that mutations in several additional genes are associated with an increased risk for inherited cancer.
  • CellMax’s Hereditary Cancer Test is the most comprehensive genetic test for hereditary cancer covering 98 genes for 25 hereditary cancers.
  • Testing is performed at our CLIA-certified lab in California, conforming to the highest quality standards for clinical testing.

WHO IS THIS TEST FOR

  • Healthy individuals who want to know if they are at an increased risk for cancer.
  • Individuals with a family history of cancer:
    ● A combination (usually 2 or more) of cancers on the same side of the family.
    ● A family member with breast, colorectal, endometrial, and possibly other types of cancers before age 50.
    ● A family member with a rare (i.e. triple-negative breast cancer, ovarian cancer) cancers at any age.
  • Individuals in certain ethnic groups (eg., Ashkenazi Jewish) that have an increased risk for certain cancers.
  • Individuals with cancer who want to understand if their cancer was hereditary, and if they are at an increased risk for other cancers.

REFERENCES:

  1. Easton, Douglas F., Deborah Ford, and D. Timothy Bishop. “Breast and ovarian cancer incidence in BRCA1-mutation carriers. Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium.” American journal of human genetics 56.1 (1995): 265.
  2. Petrucelli, Nancie, Mary B. Daly, and Gerald L. Feldman. “BRCA1 and BRCA2 hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.” (2013).
  3. Antoniou A, Pharoah PDP, Narod S, et al. Average Risks of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Associated with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations Detected in Case Series Unselected for Family History: A Combined Analysis of 22 Studies. American Journal of Human Genetics. 2003
  4. www.bethedifferencefoundation.org/our-mission-history/ovarian-cancer-facts-symptoms/brca-information
  5. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/survival-rates.html
  6. www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/understanding-a-breast-cancer-diagnosis/breast-cancer-survival-rates.html
  7. Hampel, Heather, et al. “A practice guideline from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors: referral indications for cancer predisposition assessment.” Genetics in Medicine 17.1 (2015): 70.